Meaningful

[Meaningful Mondays] It's time to stand out

  • 22 February 2021
  • 7 replies
  • 150 views
[Meaningful Mondays] It's time to stand out
Userlevel 4
  • Director of Brand at Typeform
  • 4 replies

To become a meaningful brand to someone, you have to give more than you get. Because of clutter (media, products, features, content), you're going to have to radically differentiate yourself.



💡 Think about your own company. How will you differentiate yourself from all the clutter? In what ways can you give more to others? How can your turn your marketing into the ultimate benefit for your customer, or potential customers? How can you make your advertising valuable? I'd love to discuss this with you here.

 

Here are the two "Typeform presents" interviews mentioned in the video:

Part One: Rand Fishkin – Paul sits with Rand Fishkin, founder of Moz and SparkToro, to discuss everything from imposter syndrome, to dropping out of college, and some golden nuggets on SEO success.

Part Two: Adam Lisagor - Paul travels to Los Angeles (pre-Covid) to meet with Adam Lisagor, founder of Sandwich. They discuss vulnerability, film sets, and the unmatched power of being yourself.

 


7 replies

Userlevel 7
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Love the Moz post!! Especially the part about imposter syndrome, something I still struggle with at least daily. 

Userlevel 5

I remember seeing the 2011 ‘marketing technologies’ image with 150 brands - wow, have we come a LONG way since then with over 8,000 (crazy high and very difficult to differentiate).

I believe when brands focus on how well they serve prospects and customers is what really stands out especially in over crowded spaces. It’s still a struggle to get noticed but unique service is a good place to start. 

Great video!

 

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I really love these videos, Paul. The point about features is very real and the truth is software companies had been focusing just on tech for decades. 

I had a great conversation with @angela_typeform the other day where she reminded me that Customer Success - now a common department in SaaS companies - is a very recent thing. 

The concept of community is also really new and I think companies are still figuring out what this means to them. But you said it on your video, it’s all about values. 

This article on Tech Crunch raised a few eyebrows on Twitter the other day:

 

Chief community officer is the new CMO

 

I don’t think the CMO is going anywhere any time soon (and it possibly shouldn’t). The important point here is that companies are starting to look at their audiences as communities, as opposed to markets. This means going beyond product and pricing and investing in creating a closer relationship with your ‘customers’.  

It’s all music to my ears, specially since I believe this is pushing brands to be better and put people (and hopefully planet) first. 

 

 

 

Userlevel 7
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I really love these videos, Paul. The point about features is very real and the truth is software companies had been focusing just on tech for decades. 

I had a great conversation with @angela_typeform the other day where she reminded me that Customer Success - now a common department in SaaS companies - is a very recent thing. 

The concept of community is also really new and I think companies are still figuring out what this means to them. But you said it on your video, it’s all about values. 

This article on Tech Crunch raised a few eyebrows on Twitter the other day:

 

Chief community officer is the new CMO

 

I don’t think the CMO is going anywhere any time soon (and it possibly shouldn’t). The important point here is that companies are starting to look at their audiences as communities, as opposed to markets. This means going beyond product and pricing and investing in creating a closer relationship with your ‘customers’.  

It’s all music to my ears, specially since I believe this is pushing brands to be better and put people (and hopefully planet) first. 

 

 

 

@Gabriel - i like the CMO (community version) idea.. i saw that as well and over the years i have seen this type of role ebb and flow in companies: if you follow the “Harvard Business School” dictum of the 70s - if it does not tie directly to profit objective, then it is charity and we won’t do it - or at least a modified version of that, then companies would install this role when times were good/profitable/growing and at the first signs of recession or drop in profits, it would go out the door (it’s a cost and we need to trim costs….!!!) 

I think with the ‘invest where your values are’ movements today, call it ESG if you will, there is a large push to keep and maintain these community roles. The older i get (i AM old) the more I believe this is an important role and a must-have for all companies to succeed. 

@paul - great series! and great interviews.. more please.. 

Userlevel 7
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ok.. i have decided.. i want to be Typeform’s Chief Community Officer.. that’s it.. 

where do i sign up??

des

Userlevel 6

ok.. i have decided.. i want to be Typeform’s Chief Community Officer.. that’s it.. 

where do i sign up??

des

In my eyes you already are @john.desborough :heart_eyes:  (don't tell @Gabriel )

Userlevel 7
Badge +1

ok.. i have decided.. i want to be Typeform’s Chief Community Officer.. that’s it.. 

where do i sign up??

des

In my eyes you already are @john.desborough :heart_eyes:  (don't tell @Gabriel )

lol.. @James - not this here technical community lol.. but the one @Gabriel highlighted in his note above - I wanna work with Paul and you folks and blow the lid off the popsicle stand lol.. 

*doing my part every day to create meaning and smiles*

 

des

 

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